What do we mean?

IPT: to enable all students to engage with in-person activity should they wish to, there should be two ‘pathways’ for delivery:

On campus pathway: Students are physically present for a 4hr scheduled session.

Online pathway: Students are remotely present for some/all of the 4hr scheduled session.

Delivering IPT in GTA spaces

We need to ensure that in-person teaching (IPT) for students is both integral to their education and seen as such by them. Course teams must make sure every student is able to engage with in-person time if they wish to, and provide an online alternative for students not able to attend in-person. In person teaching provides an opportunity for staff and students to interact, establish community and develop their sense of belonging.

To enable all students to engage with in-person activity should they wish to, there are two ‘pathways’ for delivery:

On campus pathway: Students are physically present for a 4hr scheduled session. Students will be able to see their room in MyTimetable.

Online pathway: Students are remotely present for some/all of the 4hr scheduled session. Remote students have been allocated to sessions taking time differences into account.

Students are predominantly expected to be working in pairs or small groups during these sessions. We recommend that the whole class is involved in any introductory briefing and wrap-up discussion. You may want to share any pre-reading, information about IPT exercises and feedback with students via Moodle.

For any technical issues in the teaching spaces, the AV team will still be your first point of contact, and will be available on ext 4846.

The different scenarios for delivering both pathways for IPT are listed below with general teaching guidance, along with practical steps for using the technology in the GTA rooms.

Whichever pathway you choose, it's important to be flexible with the session schedule and timings. IPT is a collaborative community activity and students should be reminded that it is not a traditional lecture.

Different Teaching Scenarios

Scenario:

This, the simplest scenario, in many respects mirrors teaching in a GTA space pre-COVID-19. This is where you are teaching one group of students in one teaching room. Parallel sessions may be taking place in multiple rooms for the Unit/Cohort, but there is no requirement to communicate or collaborate between those rooms, either between students or staff.

Guidance:

The main technical difference to note is how you record sessions in the GTA rooms this year, if required. Indeed, firstly, think about what needs to be recorded, if at all. What are students going to gain from the recording? If you decide not to record IPT time, we would recommend discussing this with your students so that they are informed, and understand the reasoning behind your decision.

This academic year, due to COVID-19, there are no scheduled lecture recordings; staff will have to initiate the recording in the GTA rooms as required. Staff should use the Panopto Desktop Recorder, which is installed on all GTA computers. Please type "Panopto Recorder" into the search bar on the desktop to find and launch the recorder.

Either:

  • Set the recording to save in My Folder and then move the recording to the Moodle-linked folder later.
  • Or set the recording in Panopto recorder to save directly to the Moodle-linked folder for your unit.
  • The instructions for how to do this are contained within this FAQ. (Note: the guidance is written from the perspective of using your own Desktop recorder; instead, you will be using the one on the PC in the GTA rooms, and there might be a few minor differences, for which in-room instructions will be provided by the lectern on how to select the appropriate webcam(s) and audio input(s) in the GTA room).
  • If either the Panopto Desktop Recorder software or in-room instructions are missing, please contact the AV team. For AV related emergencies, please phone ext. 4846. To report a fault in the GTA rooms please fill out the AV fault form.

Top Tip if Recording:

If you are asking a question of the group, please ensure it is spoken into the in-room microphone. If a student asks a question, you may need to repeat it into the microphone so that it can be heard on the recording. Similarly, answers to questions may need to be repeated into the microphone. This is especially important if you will be using this recording separately with remote students.

Scenario:

This scenario can operate in two different ways.

  1. An additional staff member is present for the entirety of the sessions in the additional room(s) and will be able to log in and remain by the GTA PC at all times. Note: staff must not log in to a PC in the GTA room and leave the PC(s) unattended for IT security reasons.
  2.  A single member of staff needs to split their time across multiple room(s).

In both cases, we suggest that you select carefully which option you pick, reflecting on you (and your teaching team's) levels of technical confidence, and pedagogical awareness of teaching across multiple rooms at once.

For (1), careful planning and discussion with all staff involved in delivery of the IPT session will be essential so that everyone understands fully what is expected, the schedule of activities for the session and which technologies are to be used during the sessions. How you teach between the different rooms will be up to your teaching team to discuss, as will your choice of tool(s).  Ensure that you familiarise yourself in advance of the session with how these tools work, and their benefits and limitations. Set clear ground rules for students on how you will be communicating with them, and how they should communicate with you and each other, and also how staff will be communicating with each other too during the session. Will students need to raise "virtual hands", or can they just type into the chat box? How will you know when to mute/unmute mics between rooms if you wish to broadcast a message?

For (2), reflect on whether you feel confident to teach across multiple rooms unassisted, and perhaps pick tasks and activities that students can conduct on their own in pairs and small groups. Think about how you want to communicate with students in the other room, and as with (1), set clear ground rules for students on how you will be communicating with them, and how they should communicate with you and each other. Will students need to raise "virtual hands", or can they just type into the chat box? How will you know when to mute/unmute mics between rooms if you wish to broadcast a message.

Whichever scenario you pick, we recommend you build in extra time for the first few sessions while you learn how to "use the rooms", and also ask for any informal feedback from students on how the sessions are going and if those in remote rooms can engage well with the learning activities. Above all else: keep things simple, particularly in the first few sessions.

Guidance:


Teaching with Additional Members of Staff Across Multiple Rooms

Various technical solutions exist to support this type of delivery.

  • Zoom: All teaching staff in the multiple rooms should log on to a single Zoom meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all staff  and students if necessary. Staff may need to assign host/alternative hosts/co-hosts once the meeting has started (this can be done in the meeting room). Students may wish to also log in to the meeting on their personal devices, if required so that collaboration can happen across rooms.
  • Teams:  All teaching staff in the multiple rooms should log on to a single Team meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all staff and students if necessary. Students may wish to also log in to the meeting on their personal devices, if required so that collaboration can happen across rooms.
  • ViVi: instructions to follow, but staff can use ViVi to share content across multiple rooms. We do not recommend using ViVi if you wish to have students collaborating between rooms, or wanting to broadcast messages between rooms.

Top Tip during the IPT session

If you are asking a question of the group and wish to share this between rooms, please ensure it is spoken into the in-room microphone and use the meeting chat to alert members of teaching staff if needed to turn on the speakers in the other room(s). If a student asks a question, you may need to repeat it into the microphone so that it can be heard in the other room(s). Similarly, answers to questions may need to be repeated into the microphone. This is especially important if you will be using this recording separately with remote students.


A Single Member of Staff Needs to Split their Time Across Multiple Room(s).

There are different approaches to teaching between rooms with one member of staff. You could either set the additional room a clear self-paced task on Moodle for them to then collaborate with in the room in their groups/pairs. You may then wish to join them physically at some point during the IPT time to "check in" on them. We recommend that you make this clear to students on Moodle when you will be joining them, and if you expect them to produce anything when you do join the room (e.g. a mini presentation).

Alternatively, you can use a virtual teaching room, such as Zoom or Teams, to teach across rooms, but this will require all students to be logged on to the meeting using their personal devices and headsets. You should not log on to a GTA computer in multiple rooms at once, leaving one of the PCs unattended. Again, setting clear instructions on Moodle in advance of the session will be essential.

  • Zoom:  log on to the Zoom meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all staff and students if necessary.
  • Teams:  log on to a single Team meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all staff and students if necessary.

Top Tip during the IPT session

In this scenario, all students should use a headset and microphone, and you should use the in-room microphone when teaching via Zoom or Teams. If you are asking a question of students between the rooms, please ensure it is spoken into the in-room microphone and/or via the chat window. We recommend that you set clear expectations of how students should communicate during the IPT session in advance on Moodle (e.g. via chat/raised hand or by unmuting themselves).


Recording

Firstly, think about what needs to be recorded, if at all. What are students going to gain from the recording?

The main difference to note is how you record sessions in the GTA rooms this year. This academic year, due to COVID-19, there are no scheduled lecture recordings; staff will have to initiate the recording in the GTA room as required.

Staff have various options to record the IPT session if run between multiple rooms.


Teaching with Additional Members of Staff Across Multiple Rooms

We recommend that only one member of staff records the session, and that you agree this in advance. If using Zoom or Teams, the person who scheduled the meeting should take responsibility for pressing the record button at the start of the session. For Zoom, only the person who schedules the meeting will receive a copy of the recording in Panopto, irrespective of who clicks the record button. As Zoom is directly linked with Panopto, we would recommend this tool if recording is required. Guidance on how to record using Zoom, and how to share the recording is on our Zoom FAQ Hub page. Please note: you can not record breakout rooms.

Due to a recent change on Teams, we do not recommend that you record virtual session on Teams. If you wish to do so, please start the Panopto Desktop Record before starting Teams, and record your session directly into Re:View.


A Single Member of Staff Needs to Split their Time Across Multiple Room(s)

You have two choices. You can either record the activity in the main teaching room using Panopto Desktop Recorder, or virtual teaching activity on Zoom or Teams.

Panopto Desktop Recorder

Use Panopto Desktop Recorder, which is installed on all GTA computers. Please type "Panopto Recorder" into the search bar on the desktop to find and launch the recorder.

Either:

  • Set the recording to save in My Folder and then move the recording to the Moodle-linked folder later.
  • Or set the recording in Panopto recorder to save directly to the Moodle-linked folder for your unit.
  • The instructions for how to do this are contained within this FAQ. (Note: the guidance is written from the perspective of using your own Desktop recorder; instead, you will be using the one on the PC in the GTA rooms, and there might be a few minor differences, for which in-room instructions will be provided by the lectern on how to select the appropriate webcam(s) and audio input(s) in the GTA room).
  • If either the Panopto Desktop Recorder software or in-room instructions are missing, please contact the AV team. For AV related emergencies, please phone ext. 4846. To report a fault in the GTA rooms please fill out the AV fault form.

Zoom and Teams

If using Zoom or Teams, the person who scheduled the meeting should take responsibility for pressing the record button at the start of the session. For Zoom, only the person who schedules the meeting will receive a copy of the recording in Re:View, irrespective of who clicks the record button.. As Zoom is directly linked with Re:View, we would recommend this tool if recording is required. Guidance on how to record using Zoom, and how to share the recording is on our Zoom FAQ Hub page. Please note: you can not record breakout rooms.

Due to a recent change on Teams, we do not recommend that you record virtual session on Teams. If you wish to do so, please start the Panopto Desktop Record before starting Teams, and record your session directly into Re:View.


 

Scenario:

This scenario can operate in many different ways, but for simplicity we suggest the following approach:

  • In person and remote students both join the same IPT session and work on the same activity.
  • To support this, teach both the classroom and remote students on either Zoom (recommended) or Teams.
  • If students will be working in small groups, we have found it's more successful to group remote students together, rather than try to form mixed groups of in person/remote students.
  • Ice breaker activities will help students get to know each other and build community.
  • Students in the physical classroom can talk to each other (and you), but to communicate with everyone use the virtual teaching platform.
  • Provide very clear step-by-step instructions for the activity (ideally on a single ppt slide which can be left on the screen).
  • Try to include the whole group in a wrap-up discussion at the end of the session (not all groups are required to speak during this time).

We suggest that you reflect carefully on this option, as it will be challenging (at least initially) for you and potentially your students. It will require planning, clear communication, clear scaffolding, a reasonable degree of technical competence and confidence, and a pedagogical awareness of teaching across multiple spaces (physical and virtual) at the same time.

Indeed, careful planning and discussion w will be essential so that everyone understands fully what is expected, the schedule of activities for the session and which technologies are to be used during the sessions. How you teach between the GTA room and online will be up to you to discuss, as will your choice of tool(s).  Ensure that you familiarise yourself in advance of the session with how these tools work, and their benefits and limitations. Set clear ground rules for students on how you will be communicating with them, and how they should communicate with you and each other. Will students need to raise "virtual hands", or can they just type into the chat box?

Guidance:


Teaching in a Blended Environment

Firstly, all your students will need access to a device (ideally a laptop or PC if remotely connected), a headset (essential) and a webcam (desirable).  You will need to run the class from the GTA PC (if connecting to the in-room microphones/webcams and screen), or from your own personal device with a headset and webcam. We do not recommend using mobile phones to deliver teaching.

Various technical solutions exist to support this type of delivery.

  • Zoom: Everyone should log on to a single Zoom meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all the students. Staff may wish to assign students as co-hosts, if appropriate, once the meeting has started (this can be done in the meeting room).  You may or may not wish to make use of breakout rooms to mix your GTA and remote students for group work.
  • Teams:  Everyone should log on to a single Team meeting. You should pre-schedule this meeting, and we would recommend that you use the Moodle scheduler so that the meeting link is in one place, and clearly advertised to all the students.
  • You could also use Moodle during the session, making use of the discussions forums, and setting activities for groups to work on together. Additionally, you could use Moodle group activities to set tasks, and then use Zoom or Teams for students to co-present their work.
  • Whatever you choose - try and keep it simple in the first instance, until both you and your students gain in confidence.

Top Tip during the IPT session

If you are asking a question or responding to a question, please ensure it is spoken either into the in-room microphone, your personal device's microphone, and/or and use the meeting chat. As all participants (both physically and virtually) should be on their own devices, they should all be able to contribute to the conversation. For in-room participants, they can obviously talk to each other off their devices if they are not collaborating with students who are working remotely, or they could agree set times to "log back in" if they wish to work on tasks individually. Again, clear communication between you and your students is important so that this runs smoothly, and everyone has the opportunity to be involved.

Recording the IPT time

Firstly, think about what needs to be recorded, if at all. What are students going to gain from the recording?

The main difference to note is how you record sessions in the GTA rooms this year. This academic year, due to COVID-19, there are no scheduled lecture recordings; staff will have to initiate the recording in the GTA room as required.

If you are using either your own device or the GTA PC, use Zoom to record your session as Zoom is directly linked with Panopto. Guidance on how to record using Zoom, and how to share the recording is on our Zoom FAQ Hub page. Please note: you can not record breakout rooms.

Due to a recent change on Teams, we do not recommend that you record virtual session on Teams. If you wish to do so, please start the Panopto Desktop Record before starting Teams, and record your session directly into Re:View.


Scenario:

This will be challenging, and we do not recommend this approach unless you are confident that you can undertake this approach effectively, and have additional support from other teaching staff in the additional GTA rooms. This scenario can operate in many different ways, but for simplicity we suggest the following approach:

  • In person and remote students both join the same IPT session and work on the same activity. In person students may be spread out across several GTA rooms.
  • To support this, teach both the classroom and remote students on either Zoom (recommended) or Teams.
  • If students will be working in small groups, we have found it's more successful to group remote students together, rather than try to form mixed groups of in person/remote students.
  • Ice breaker activities will help students get to know each other and build community.
  • Students in the physical classrooms can talk to each other, but to communicate with everyone use the virtual teaching platform.
  • Consider multiple co-hosts if using Zoom - and allocate people to monitor the chat, respond to any technical queries, and to help mentor breakout rooms if they are being used.
  • Consider nominating someone to be 'in charge' of each room, including remote students. They can ask questions on behalf of their group, provide feedback and clarification.
  • Provide very clear step-by-step instructions for the activity (ideally on a single ppt slide which can be left on the screen).
  • Try to include the whole group in a wrap-up discussion at the end of the session (not all groups are required to speak during this time).
  • Additional staff members in the GTA rooms should log in and remain by the GTA PC at all times. Note: staff must not log in to a PC in the GTA room and leave the PC(s) unattended for IT security reasons.

We suggest that you reflect carefully on this option, as it will be challenging (at least initially) for you, other staff and potentially your students. It will require planning, clear communication, clear scaffolding, a reasonable degree of technical competence and confidence, and a pedagogical awareness of teaching across multiple spaces (physical and virtual) at the same time.

Indeed, careful planning and discussion with all staff involved in delivery of the IPT session will be essential so that everyone understands fully what is expected, the schedule of activities for the session and which technologies are to be used during the sessions. How you teach between the different rooms and online will be up to your teaching team to discuss, as will your choice of tool(s).  Ensure that you familiarise yourself in advance of the session with how these tools work, and their benefits and limitations. Set clear ground rules for students on how you will be communicating with them, and how they should communicate with you and each other, and also how staff will be communicating with each other too during the session. Will students need to raise "virtual hands", or can they just type into the chat box? How will you know when to mute/unmute mics between rooms if you wish to broadcast a message?

Whichever approach you pick, we recommend you build in extra time for the first few sessions while you learn how to "use the rooms", and also ask for any informal feedback from students on how the sessions are going and if those in remote rooms can engage well with the learning activities. Above all else: keep things simple, particularly in the first few sessions.

Guidance:

In many respects, follow the same guidance as for Scenarios 2 and 3. If you need more specialist help, please contact the CLT.

Please follow the general tips and guidance for LOIL teaching. This will be combined with your learning materials prepared for Independent Learning on Moodle. In other words, a careful combination of synchronous and asynchronous teaching.

At the start of the IPT session:

  • Provide additional time for yourself to set up the session once you are in the room and for students to connect to the Wifi and session (if required).
  • Remind students of the University guidelines for social distancing and the wearing of masks.
  • Remind students that they should wipe down their desk before they begin and that they cannot move desks during the session.
  • Make sure you plan in breaks during the session. Staff and students are allowed to take food and drink into IPT sessions.

At the end of the IPT session:

  • If delivering to multiple cohorts, offer a whole-class wrap-up and ensure that those joining online have a chance to contribute as well as those on-campus. Be firm but fair when it comes to timing during these discussions.
  • Share the key outcomes of the session via Moodle after the session. This could be a recording of the wrap-up discussion, a follow-up podcast from you, a copy of the documents/Padlet/whiteboards which were used during the session, a document written by you summarising the key points, or some combination thereof.
  • Remind students that they need to tidy up after themselves at the end, including clearing any food/drink that they’ve brought in, and wipe down their workspace with the cleaning products provided.

For technical support in the GTA rooms, contact the AV Team
For general support, contact the TEL team

Updated on: 07/10/2020